FamilySearch Adds More Than 6.6 Million Indexed Records and Images to Collections from Austria, Brazil, England, Mexico, Portugal, Spain, and the United States

April 3, 2014

FamilySearch has added more than 6.6 million indexed records and images to collections from Austria, Brazil, Dominican Republic, England, Mexico, Nicaragua, Portugal, Spain, Switzerland, and the United States. Notable collection updates include the 1,631,210 indexed records from the Mexico, Hidalgo, Catholic Church Records, 1546–1971, collection; the 411,508 images from the U.S., Minnesota, County Marriages, 1860–1949, collection; and the 1,117,286 images from the Austria, Seigniorial Records, 1537–1920, collection. See the table below for the full list of updates. Search these diverse collections and more than 3.5 billion other records for free at FamilySearch.org.

Searchable historic records are made available on FamilySearch.org through the help of thousands of volunteers from around the world. These volunteers transcribe (index) information from digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. More volunteers are needed (particularly those who can read foreign languages) to keep pace with the large number of digital images being published online at FamilySearch.org. Learn more about volunteering to help provide free access to the worldís historic genealogical records online at FamilySearch.org.

FamilySearch is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources for free at FamilySearch.org or through more than 4,600 family history centers in 132 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Collection Indexed Records Digital Images Comments
Austria, Seigniorial Records, 1537–1920 0 1,117,286 Added images to an existing collection.
Brazil, Piauí, Civil Registration, 1875–2013 0 187,787 Added images to an existing collection.
Brazil, São Paulo, Immigration Cards, 1902–1980 0 751,108 Added images to an existing collection.
Dominican Republic, Civil Registration, 1801–2010 0 181,862 Added images to an existing collection.
England, Norfolk Register of Electors, 1844–1952 67,098 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection.
England, Northumberland, Cumberland, Durham, Miscellaneous Records, 969–2007 0 107,121 Added images to an existing collection.
Mexico, Coahuila, Catholic Church Records, 1627–1978 44,393 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection.
Mexico, Hidalgo, Catholic Church Records, 1546–1971 1,631,210 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection.
Mexico, Puebla, Catholic Church Records, 1545–1977 76,270 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection.
Mexico, Sonora, Catholic Church Records, 1657–1994 16,594 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection.
Mexico, Zacatecas, Catholic Church Records, 1605–1980 32,331 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection.
Nicaragua, Civil Registration, 1809–2013 183,723 117,825 Added indexed records and images to an existing collection.
Portugal, Coimbra, Passport Registers and Application Files, 1835–1938 0 190,710 Added images to an existing collection.
Portugal, Viana do Castelo, Catholic Church Records, 1537–1911 0 616 Added images to an existing collection.
Spain, Province of Gerona, Municipal Records, 1566–1956 0 10,682 Added images to an existing collection.
Spain, Records of Widows and Orphans of Spanish Officers, 1833–1960 0 187,704 Added images to an existing collection.
Switzerland, Fribourg, Census, 1834 35,826 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection.
U.S., District of Columbia Marriages, 1811–1950 5,287 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection.
U.S., Idaho, Bonneville County Records, 1867–2012 0 3,160 Added images to an existing collection.
U.S., Illinois, Lee County Records, 1830–1954 0 9,521 Added images to an existing collection.
U.S., Minnesota, County Marriages, 1860–1949 0 411,508 Added images to an existing collection.
U.S., New York, Orange County Probate Records, 1787–1938 0 153,000 Added images to an existing collection.
U.S., New York, Queens County Probate Records, 1785–1950 0 156,679 Added images to an existing collection.
U.S., North Carolina, Civil Action Court Papers, 1712–1970 0 114,332 Added images to an existing collection.
U.S., North Carolina, County Marriages, 1762–1979 198,482 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection.
U.S., Oregon, Douglas County Records, 1850–1983 0 192,530 Added images to an existing collection.
U.S., Oregon, Grant County Records, 1851–1992 0 35,132 Added images to an existing collection.
U.S., South Carolina, Darlington County Records, 1798–1928 0 77,316 Added images to an existing collection.
United States Veterans Administration Pension Payment Cards, 1907–1933 357,892 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection.

FamilySearch Adds Close to 11.1 Million Indexed Records and Images to Collections from Brazil, Canada, England, Mexico, Portugal, Spain, and the United States

March 26, 2014

FamilySearch has added close to 11.1 million indexed records and images to collections from Barbados, BillionGraves, Brazil, Canada, England, Mexico, Peru, Portugal, Puerto Rico, South Africa, Spain, Sweden, and the United States. Notable collection updates include the 1,703,529 indexed records from the U.S., Texas, County Tax Rolls, 1846–1910, collection; the 766,368 indexed records and images from the new Canadian Headstones, collection; and the 2,917,490 indexed records from the England, Kent, Register of Electors, 1570–1907, collection. See the table below for the full list of updates. Search these diverse collections and more than 3.5 billion other records for free atFamilySearch.org.

Searchable historic records are made available on FamilySearch.org through the help of thousands of volunteers from around the world. These volunteers transcribe (index) information from digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. More volunteers are needed (particularly those who can read foreign languages) to keep pace with the large number of digital images being published online at FamilySearch.org. Learn more about volunteering to help provide free access to the worldís historic genealogical records online at FamilySearch.org.

FamilySearch is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources for free at FamilySearch.org or through more than 4,600 family history centers in 132 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Collection Indexed Records Digital Images Comments
Barbados, Church Records, 1637–1887 253,209 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection.
BillionGraves Index 534,057 534,057 Added indexed records and images to an existing collection.
Brazil, Pernambuco, Civil Registration, 1804–2013 0 109,743 Added images to an existing collection.
Canadian Headstones 766,368 0 New indexed record collection.
England, Cornwall and Devon Parish Registers, 1538–2010 171,083 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection.
England, Kent, Register of Electors, 1570–1907 2,917,490 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection.
Mexico, Archdiocese of Guadalajara, Miscellaneous Marriage Records, 1539–1939 0 65,075 Added images to an existing collection.
Peru, Huánuco, Civil Registration, 1889–1997 0 137,860 Added images to an existing collection.
Portugal, Lamego, Diocesan Records, 1529–1963 0 237,263 Added images to an existing collection.
Puerto Rico, Catholic Church Records, 1645–1969 0 1,329 Added images to an existing collection.
South Africa, Cape Province, Civil Deaths, 1895–1972 11,622 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection.
South Africa, Orange Free State, Estate Files, 1951–2006 10 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection.
Spain, Province of Cádiz, Municipal Records, 1784–1956 0 106,020 Added images to an existing collection.
Sweden, Kalmar Church Records, 1577–1907; index 1625–1860 30,025 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection.
U.S., Illinois, Northern District Petitions for Naturalization, 1906–1991 275,482 0 Added images to an existing collection.
U.S., Iowa, County Marriages, 1838–1934 223,134 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection.
U.S., New York, Yates County, Swann Vital Records Collection, 1723–2009 63,947 87,588 New indexed records and images collection.
U.S., North Carolina, Estate Files, 1663–1979 30,607 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection.
U.S., Texas, County Tax Rolls, 1846–1910 2,610,151 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection.
New England, Petitions for Naturalization, 1787–1931 0 7,940 Added images to an existing collection.
United States Muster Rolls of the Marine Corps, 1798–1892 1,703,529 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection.
United States, Obituaries, American Historical Society of Germans from Russia, 1899–2012 3,322 4,154 New indexed records and images collection.
United States Social Security Death Index 213,017 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection.

Ancestry Insider Blog

Link

Have you been following the Ancestry Insider Blog?   Or subscribing to it?   Why not?

http://ancestryinsider.blogspot.com

Are you confused as to what FamilySearch is trying to do with the new Family Tree option and how to use it?   Wish there was a user manual to explain it?  Wonder why you cannot find one.   This is just one of the topics tackled.   (Spoiler alert:  Yes, there is a Quick Start Guide, a full blown Reference Guide, and special help guides).

More that FamilySearch is covered.   You need to visit the blog, or better yet, subscribe and have updates delivered to your inbox.

Irish Research on Ancestry Open thru March 17

Think you might be Irish every day of the year—not just on St. Patrick’s Day? To help you find out, subscription genealogy site Ancestry.com has opened up its collections of Irish records for free through March 17.

The free records include

  • church and civil indexes to Irish births and baptisms, marriages, and deaths (these are from FamilySearch)
  • the 1901 and 1911 Irish censuses
  • Catholic sacramental registers
  • Quebec vital and church records from the Drouin collection
  • Griffith’s Valuation
  • New York Emigrant Savings Bank records
  • Irish Canadian emigration records
Search the Irish record collections here. You’ll need to register for a free Ancestry.com account (or log into your free account) to take advantage of this offer. The free period ends Monday, March 17 at 11:59 p.m. ET.

Mocavo Access Free Until Midnight Sunday, March 16

Press Release from MOCAVO
Over the past few months, we received so much positive feedback about our open access weekends that we decided to do it again!

Back by popular demand, all Mocavo Basic members can now access all of the premium Mocavo Gold features for free until Sunday at Midnight. This means you can search our entire collection to your heart’s content, upload your tree to receive new discovery alerts, download and print any document you find, and much more!

Need some extra help using Mocavo Gold? 
If you would like to get the most out of the Mocavo Gold Open Access Weekend, check out these easy-to-follow guides!

Read the Guide to Mocavo Gold Search

Watch a Short Video About Mocavo Gold Faceted Search 

Trouble Accessing Mocavo Gold? Check Out These Quick Tips

These premium search features are generally available to Mocavo Gold members. If you decide that you enjoy the premium features of Mocavo Gold, consider joining our revolution and becoming a part of the Mocavo Gold community.

We wish you a successful weekend full of discoveries!

Best regards,
Cliff Shaw, Founder

Policy Change for Patrons Requesting Photocopies From the Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah

February 4, 2013 By

Photocopy

Please note the following change in the policy for patrons who are requesting copies from the Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

All requests for information copied from films, book pages, CDs, marriage, death or birth certificates, wills and/or deeds, etc. will be copied in digital format and emailed to patrons in a zipped PDF or JPG file format. There is no charge for this service if we are able to email to information to patrons. NOTE: Requests are limited to 5 image shots per month.

If a patron does not have an email address, we can mail the information to the patron using the US Postal Service.  However, as much as possible, we will rely on emailing all requests for information through the internet. If patrons do not own a computer or do not have an email address, they can request to have the information emailed to their local Family History Center, where they can print the information at the center.

Patrons should request copies by submitting their request here: Photoduplication Request Form.  All requests MUST include the following information:

  • Film or Fiche number
  • Item number
  • Name of Individual(s) referred to in the record
  • Title of the record
  • Name of parents, spouse, grantor, grantee, etc.
  • Event type (Birth, Death or Marriage)
  • Complete event date and place
  • Event place (county, parish, township, etc.)
  • Volume or page number
  • Registration or Certificate Number
  • Any other information that will help us locate your record.

Forever accessible archives? Michigan moves its records to the cloud.

Since 1974, archivists in Michigan have been looking for ways to preserve the state’s electronic records in such a way that they could both last for hundreds of years and always be easily searchable by government officials and the public at large. But until very recently, there simply wasn’t an available system that would allow that vision to be realized.

Preservica dashboard

Preservica DashboardClick to enlarge.

Archivist Mark Harvey said that over the years the state figured out piecemeal ways to preserve data, such as storing files on network drives, CDs, DVDs and other portable media. “Saving to portable media worked,” Harvey said, “but how useful it was depended on the type of data. Without access to some of the legacy programs that created the data, it really didn’t do much.”

In 1996 the state began to tackle its electronic records management in earnest. It needed a solution that would not only preserve the records, but ensure that they would be searchable and accessible, even as file and media formats evolved.

As part of that effort, Michigan hired Caryn Wojcik as a government records archivist and she soon encountered obstacles that would define the solution’s scope. First, there was no computer system or data center that could handle the required storage and no budget for one. Second, the state didn’t want to hire programmers to build out an expensive custom solution.

Armed with that knowledge, Wojcik participated in several grant-funded research projects to develop software that would suit the state’s needs. Eventually, Wojcik found a commercial-off-the-shelf program called Preservica that was already being used by governments in Europe, library systems around the world and smaller government organizations whose requirements were similar to Michigan’s.

“Because we put so much effort into defining our needs and goals, we were confident that Preservica was the program we needed once we saw it,” Wojcik said.

Preservica was developed by Tessella, a digital preservation technology, consulting and research company. It is a Web-based application that ingests and curates content of all types and stores it in the Amazon Web Services cloud, where it is regularly checked for data corruption and redundancy. Users can read, update, delete and preserve each piece of content or metadata, as determined by their roles.

One of Preservica’s key features is “active preservation,” the ability to move files to new formats to avoid obsolescence. When files are uploaded, Preservica identifies their formats and determines if they are at risk from obsolescence. If such files are found, Preservica offers a variety of migration tools to create a “manifestation of the file, which is accessible to current technologies,” the company said.

And because Preservica is a software-as-a-service solution, the state didn’t need to purchase special hardware, hire developers to create a special interface or install software locally.

Tessella’s director of archives Jon Tilbury explained that the system preserves records the same way professional archivists are used to conducting business.When archivists put records into Preservica, they prepare a submission package for upload, he said.

“They can embed more data if needed, but much of the existing data is already captured by the software already. For example, when archiving email, all of the tags as well as full-text archiving is already present. With a photo or a video, the name of the file and any information about it is automatically used with the option of adding more descriptive terms if needed.”

That methodology fell in perfectly with Michigan’s existing archiving workflow. Wojcik said that state agencies first identify and schedule documents that should be preserved. Those documents can be anything from the minutes of a public meeting to the findings of the state Supreme Court to reports about student achievement levels to entries for a recent art contest for the Michigan state quarter. Each department puts those records on a disk and couriers them to the Archives of Michigan or transmits them via FTP. Once the Archives of Michigan has the data, the archivists prepare an upload package and send the files into Preservica where they are backed up and protected in the cloud.

But data sitting in the Preservica cloud isn’t dead. Although the system can handle 800 different file formats, the company also keeps track of programs and version numbers, updating the archived files as needed, while also preserving the original format in case it’s needed for technical or legal reasons.

“For example, if a file is sitting around in Word 2.0 then its going to obsolete,” Tilbury said. “So we will migrate that file over to Word 2012, but when we do, we will compare the two documents to make sure each and every character is the same. And we will keep the master file in place in case we ever have to prove that the data in the file hasn’t been modified in any way.”

Wojcik says that the system is working well, but she is anxious to improve it even more, adding features like full public access. Right now the public can search to find what records have been archived. But to actually view the documents, people have to get a state archivist to retrieve them, she said. “They are all available, but not in as accessible of a format as we want. Very soon Preservica will be adding a public viewing component.”

Tilbury said Preservica’s new public viewing capability will be quickly deployed to Michigan where viewers will be restricted to read-only access. Also, the use of tabs can manage whether a limited number of documents, or not every part of a document, is viewable. So if a record has confidential information like a Social Security number, it can be hidden from public view. Tabs can likewise be matched to different roles and security levels once the new component comes online.

The Preservica system is scalable based on usage, with Tessella’s largest customer at the moment archiving over 8 petabytes of information. At the low end, organizations can store their records with the system for $1,000 per month. Michigan uses a bit more storage space than the average user, so it costs $14,000 per year, a price that will remain flat until the state needs to put more data in place.

Harvey notes that the cost to solve one of the Archive’s biggest and longest running problems is relatively inexpensive when compared to the alternatives. “For that amount of money, we probably could have only bought about 100 hours of a developer’s time,” Harvey said. “And that would not have gotten us anywhere close to having a production system. Instead, we are already archiving records with Preservica and can concentrate on improving a system that already works well.”

About the Author

John Breeden II is a freelance technology writer for GCN.

DSGR Magazine Digitization Project Status

The final phase of the DSGR Magazine Digitization Project has been completed. All issues from 1937 thru current are now on line in the Members Only area of www.dsgr.org . In addition, there is a new page in the Members Only area called DSGR Magazine Guide to help members pinpoint the issue they are looking to find. Indexes are also available in the public area which will have the magazaine indexes from 1957 through current. A link to a cumulative full-name index merging volumes 1- 31 and 51-76 is available as well.

Thank you to all of our generous donors who made this possible.

Michigan (including Detroit Death Records)

We received the following inquiry yesterday:

Hi,
I have to say that I am saddened to see that Detroit genealogy records (births, marriages, etc) are NOT included in the Wayne County microfilms that are currently available at local libararies.  Why do the microfilms always exclude Detroit?
Would it be possible for the Detroit Genealogy Group via Burton Historical Collection to contact Familysearch and loan them the Detroit City microfilms for scanning so Detroit’s records can be searchable to everyone?  Not everyone has time to visit Burton and many people I am sure would love to research Detroit.
The following is my reply:
Detroit has always maintained its own Vital Records and not 
transferred them to Wayne County.   The reason they have been 
separated is because that was the law. That is, up until early this 
year when the whole process was transferred from Detroit to Wayne 
County.   (See http://www.dsgr.org/blog for details).

As far as DSGR / Burton Historical Collection loaning the microfilm to
FamilySearch, that cannot be done.   Since you have gone to FS, you 
know that there is a death index for Michigan through 1952 which 
does include Detroit.   What is not evident on the FS site is that 
the State Archives of Michigan is currently digitizing the death 
records that are indexed on FS.   There is a State Statute that only 
those records older than 75 years can be released as images.   So, 
the index on FS will soon have links to the Death Record images on 
www.SeekingMichigan.org though 1938.   Next year, 1939 will be added.   
This project is underway and is being processed as quickly as 
possible.

If you find you ancestor on the index, and cannot wait for the images
to be loaded, you can use the details to be included in the request to
Wayne County (again see our blog entry for links and instructions)

FamilySearch Adds Close to 4.2 Million Indexed Records and Images to Collections from Australia, Brazil, Canada, Germany, Italy, United Kingdom, and the United States

February 19, 2014

FamilySearch has added close to 4.2 million indexed records and images to collections from Australia, Austria, Brazil, Belgium, Canada, Dominican Republic, France, Germany, Honduras, Italy, New Zealand, Peru, Spain, United Kingdom, and the United States. Notable collection updates include the 543,676 images from the Brazil, São Paulo, Immigration Cards, 1902–1980, collection; the 499,702 indexed records and images from the New Zealand, Archives New Zealand, Probate Records, 1848–1991, collection; and the 264,610 images from the United Kingdom, World War I Women’s Army Auxiliary Corps Records, 1917–1920, collection. See the table below for the full list of updates. Search these diverse collections and more than 3.5 billion other records for free at FamilySearch.org.

Searchable historic records are made available on FamilySearch.org through the help of thousands of volunteers from around the world. These volunteers transcribe (index) information from digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. More volunteers are needed (particularly those who can read foreign languages) to keep pace with the large number of digital images being published online at FamilySearch.org. Learn more about volunteering to help provide free access to the worldís historic genealogical records online at FamilySearch.org.

FamilySearch is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources for free at FamilySearch.org or through more than 4,600 family history centers in 132 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Collection Indexed Records Digital Images Comments
Australia, Index to Probate Registers, 1841–1989 1,043,822 34,472 Added indexed records and images to an existing collection.
Australia, Tasmania, Miscellaneous Records, 1829–1961 0 131,642 Added images to an existing collection.
Austria, Seigniorial Records, 1537–1888 0 204,382 Added images to an existing collection.
Austria, Upper Austria, Catholic Church Records, 1581–1910 25,798 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection.
Belgium, Hainaut, Civil Registration, 1600–1911 0 202,382 Added images to an existing collection.
Brazil, São Paulo, Immigration Cards, 1902–1980 0 543,676 Added images to an existing collection.
Canada, Saskatchewan Provincial Records, 1879–1987 0 97,000 Added images to an existing collection.
Dominican Republic, Civil Registration, 1801–2010 32,693 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection.
England and Wales, Marriage Registration Index, 1837–1920 3,350 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection.
France, Auvergne, Family Genealogies by Colonel Etienne de Bellaigue de Bughas, 1400–1900 0 7,768 New browsable image collection.
Germany, Baden, Church Book Duplicates, 1810–1869 180,418 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection.
Honduras, Catholic Church Records, 1633–1978 137,642 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection.
Italy, Oristano, Oristano, Civil Registration (Tribunale), 1866–1940 0 336,318 Added images to an existing collection.
Italy, Toscana, Civil Registration (State Archive), 1804–1874 0 2,912 Added images to an existing collection.
New Zealand, Archives New Zealand, Probate Records, 1848–1991 66,216 433,486 Added indexed records and images to an existing collection.
Peru, Amazonas, Civil Registration, 1939–1997 0 11,252 Added images to an existing collection.
Spain, Cádiz, Testaments, 1531–1920 0 65,801 Added images to an existing collection.
United Kingdom, World War I Women’s Army Auxiliary Corps Records, 1917–1920 0 264,610 New browsable image collection.
United States Census (Slave Schedule), 1850 0 78,752 Added images to an existing collection.
United States, Panama Canal Zone, Employment Records and Sailing lists, 1905–1937 0 144,925 New browsable image collection.
U.S., Arkansas, Ex-Confederate Pension Records, 1891–1939 0 7,705 New browsable image collection.
U.S., California, San Francisco, Immigration Office Special Inquiry Records, 1910–1941 0 3,574 New browsable image collection.
U.S., Illinois, Non-Population Census Schedules, 1850–1880 0 33,787 New browsable image collection.
U.S., Massachusetts, Worcester County, Probate Files, 1731–1881 0 55,978 Added images to an existing collection.
U.S., Missouri, State and Territorial Census Records, 1732–1876 0 8,071 New browsable image collection.
U.S., Montana, Pondera County Records, 1910–2012 0 29,762 New browsable image collection.
U.S., South Carolina, Georgetown, Passenger Lists, 1904–1942 0 514 New browsable image collection.
U.S., Washington, Seattle, Passenger and Crew Lists of Airplanes, 1947–1954 0 5,115 New browsable image collection.
U.S., Wisconsin, Crew Lists of Ship Arrivals, 1925–1956 0 596 New browsable image collection.
U.S., Wisconsin, Crew Lists of Vessels Arriving at Manitowoc, 1925–1956 0 546 New browsable image collection.